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Monday, July 25, 2011

SHOULD SHE LOAN MONEY TO HER NEW GUY?


SHOULD SHE LOAN MONEY TO HER NEW GUY??



One divorced mom finally found her match, but the timing makes her think something fishy is going on. Should she offer to pay his bills while they figure things out?


by


DR. GILDA CARLE (Ph.D.)



Courtesy of Match.com’s Happen Magazine 


http://www.happenmag.com/magazine/index.aspx?lid=396



Dear Dr. Gilda,

I’m a divorced 44-year-old mother of two sons, ages 12 and 8. I met this tall, handsome, great guy recently and I fell head over heels in love with him. He says he likes me, but he's not in love with me yet. He has been straight up about everything in his life so far. He was scheduled to move to another state to run a family business before we met, but he decided he wants to stay here now to give our relationship a chance.

My guy had his electricity scheduled to be turned off at his home, and had already quit his job here. But since he isn't moving, he now has to start the job search all over again. I have been dating him for a month now, so should I loan him a few thousand dollars to help him out? I figure this relationship has a chance only if I give him time for his feelings to develop, and if I give him space to work through his financial issues first. He is very open and honest about everything, but I am unsure if I should loan him money, as I am struggling myself. I really love him, but I am nervous. What should I do?

Lost in Love



Dear Lost in Love,

Goodness, girl, it's only been a month and you're ready to become this dude's banker! What do you know about him, besides his being tall and handsome? You say he's "great," but until you get to know him over time, you won't really know that. Thankfully, he's using the old "I love you, but I'm not in love with you" line — except in your case, it's still only at the "I like you…" stage. I say "thankfully" because …

CLICK TO CONTINUE:

http://tinyurl.com/3gy6r7t


XXX


DR. GILDA CARLE (Ph.D.) is an internationally known psychotherapist, relationship expert, and product spokesperson. She is Match.com’s “ASK DR. GILDA” advice columnist. She is also known as the Country Music Doctor, with her “Country Cures.” She is a motivational speaker, professor of psychology & communications, the author of the well-known “Don’t Bet on the Prince!,” a test question on “Jeopardy,” NOW IN ITS SECOND EDITION, 99 Prescriptions for Fidelity, How to Win When Your Mate Cheats, and many more. She was the therapist in HBO's Emmy Award winner, "Telling Nicholas," featured on Oprah, where she guided a family to tell their 7-year-old that his mom died in the World Trade Center bombing. DR. GILDA is the Love Doc advisor for the off-Broadway show, “Miss Abigail’s Guide to Dating, Mating, & Marriage!” She is currently developing her own TV show. Visit www.DrGilda.com and get her Instant Advice!

Monday, July 11, 2011

Words Online that Turn Single Women OFF!!!


Hey, Single Dudes,

Are your online profiles and words of introduction to women online getting you the results you want? Most people are clueless about how their words are interpreted by the opposite sex. Check out some real women's reactions to some guys' come-ons. Not exactly TURN-ons!! I hope this impacts you in some way! Let me hear your thoughts.

Love,

Dr. Gilda



WORDS ONLINE THAT TURN SINGLE WOMEN OFF!


By


Dr. Gilda Carle (Ph.D.)


Courtesy of Match.com’s Happen Magazine 




Online dating can be fun, and many marriages have come out of it. But too often, I receive emails from frustrated single men like this one: "I've tried everything to be appealing online, but I seldom even get a response. What am I doing wrong? Am I too honest? Too old? Too repulsive? Too set in my ways? PLEASE HELP ME!"



When I work with singles on their profiles, I find that they are often unaware that some of the words they have used in their essays can actually be turn-offs to potential dates. Read these 10 examples below — some of them are doozies, but they all come from real profiles belonging to guys that are presumably looking for love:



1. Words that hint at your childish ways.

John posted a profile that said "I'm a boy in a man's body," figuring his "cuteness" would entice a lady to love him (and also mother the little boy in him). However, he got no takers. Most grown-up women don't fancy childish Peter Pan types. If you're looking for a mother figure, try scoping out a playground — not a dating site.



2. Words that reveal how you objectify women.

When Carl saw Lois online, he wrote her an email that said, "You are so beautiful, I'd like to drape you on my arm." Lois replied with: "What? You have me confused with a sweater." Carl defended himself, explaining that what he was trying to say "came out wrong" — but he didn't attempt to explain what he did mean originally. Making a bad outreach attempt even worse, Carl said, "Let's have dinner. Even if it doesn't work out, I'll still pay." Now with this missive, Carl had attempted to buy himself some superficial love for the cheap price of a meal. Women don't want to feel like an ornament to be displayed and fed, so naturally, Lois never responded.



3. Words that suggest you have a short fuse.

Karen received an introductory message from Robert via an online dating site. After reading his profile, she thought he seemed nice but dull, so she didn't reply — but Robert wouldn't give up. He sent Karen another message, saying, "Hi, Blondie. I sent you a message. Still waiting to hear from you. Be a sport and answer back." Karen gagged on this guy's crass familiarity. "Blondie?" she thought, still ignoring him. Robert sent a third message — but this time, he extended his fangs: "What's the matter, Blondie? Not good enough for you? You don't know what you're missing. At your age, you shouldn't be so finicky. Your loss, Sweetheart." Karen finally did respond after that — by blocking Robert permanently.



4. Words that imply you'll do whatever she asks to up your appeal.

Marge's profile photo showed her holding her dog. Moe wrote to her, saying that he loved dogs and was a card-carrying member of the ASPCA. Marge's profile also stated she worked with the homeless. Moe wrote Marge again, this time boasting that he financially supported a homeless family. Marge's profile detailed her love for workouts at her gym. Moe then wrote a third time, telling her . . .



CLICK

http://tinyurl.com/6c9q3ls

to read ALL 10!



XXXX



DR. GILDA CARLE (Ph.D.) is an internationally known psychotherapist, relationship expert, and product spokesperson. She is Match.com’s “ASK DR. GILDA” advice columnist. She is also known as the Country Music Doctor, with her “Country Cures.” She is a motivational speaker, professor of psychology & communications, the author of the well-known “Don’t Bet on the Prince!,” a test question on “Jeopardy,” NOW IN ITS SECOND EDITION, 99 Prescriptions for Fidelity, How to Win When Your Mate Cheats, and many more. She was the therapist in HBO's Emmy Award winner, "Telling Nicholas," featured on Oprah, where she guided a family to tell their 7-year-old that his mom died in the World Trade Center bombing. DR. GILDA is the Love Doc advisor for the off-Broadway show, “Miss Abigail’s Guide to Dating, Mating, & Marriage!” She is currently developing her own TV show. Visit www.DrGilda.com and get her Instant Advice!